auto - Liss Insurance Agency

Tips To Ensure Your ATV Is Properly Covered


Tips To Ensure Your ATV Is Properly Covered (NAPS)—When it comes to your all-terrain vehicle (ATV), it pays to keep your feet on the ground when it comes to insuring it. You may think it’s covered by your home-owners policy, Read more

RV insurance: Don’t hit the road without it


RV insurance: Don’t hit the road without it (October 2008) If you bought a tractor trailer, you wouldn’t add it to your car insurance policy. It’s a specialized vehicle and needs special coverages and claims handling. So why do more than Read more

Five Steps to Get Ready for Bike Season


Get ready for bike season in five simple steps There’s nothing like cruising down the open road on your motorcycle – the wind in your hair and a few bugs in your teeth. Before you hit the highways and byways this Read more

Service Centers Help Save Time and Money


Time is money: Save both Saving 5 cents a gallon on gas is great. But, if you have to drive 20 minutes to get to the station, is it really a savings? If a deal costs you valuable time, it’s Read more

Seven Shopping Strategies For New Car Buyers


Seven Shopping Strategies For New Car Buyers New car shopping can be a lot of fun, especially if you’re a car enthusiast. But others can find the experience stressful and tedious. Either way, there’s a lot to think about. According Read more

Shedding Light On Car Insurance Savings


Shedding Light On Car Insurance Savings It can be easier than you think to put the brakes on high auto insurance rates – as an independent agency, <Agency name> can help! We can review your policy and possibly help you Read more

Motorcycle Insurance 101: The Essentials


Motorcycle Insurance 101: The Essentials     (NAPS)—A motorcycle is a significant investment. Before you get your motor running and head out on the highway this season, you owe it to yourself to make sure your insurance is up-to-date and you’re properly Read more

Keep Your Cool While On The Road


Keep Your Cool While On The Road (NAPS)—With so many people on the road during peak vacation months, it may be a good time to brush up on what you should do in the event you’re involved in a crash. Here Read more

No Slip-Sliding Away: How To Stay On The Road


No Slip-Sliding Away: How To Stay On The Road (NAPS)—One thing is easy to foretell: Unpredictable weather can cause reduced visibility and hazardous driving conditions that make it challenging for even the most experienced drivers. Fortunately, there are ways to Read more

Eight Tips For The Road Ahead


Eight Tips For The Road Ahead Be Safe, Be Smart On A Long-Distance Road Trip Whether you’re traveling alone, with a buddy or with your spouse and a car full of kids, there are few things more “American” than the long-distance Read more

Three Tips To Help Your Vacation Get Off To A Worry-Free Start

by Edward Pevnick in auto

Three Tips To Help Your Vacation Get Off To A Worry-Free Start

With vacation season in full swing, you may be in the process of planning an annual getaway. While most people spend lots of time looking for ways to maximize their budget, one costly decision is often left to the last minute—whether to buy the optional insurance offered by a rental car company.

“Deciding whether to buy ‘damage waivers’ or insurance at the rental car counter can be a confusing experience—especially if you don’t know if you’re already covered by your personal auto insurance policy,” said Rick Crawley of the Progressive Group of Insurance Companies. “Optional rental car insurance can cost between $7 and $25 per day, depending on the rental car company, vehicle make and model and type of waiver. Those daily charges can significantly add to the cost of your rental.”

Follow these three tips, courtesy of Liss Insurance, to help you decide whether or not you should buy the coverage:

  1. Consult with an independent insurance agency – like Liss Insurance. As licensed insurance professionals, independent insurance agents and brokers can review and evaluate your policies to find out if the coverage you have on your personal vehicle provides protection for you in a rental car.
  2. Check with your credit card company. Some credit card companies provide coverage at no charge if you use their card to charge the cost of the rental. However, some restrictions may apply so be sure to ask for a description of the exact coverages provided.
  3. Take your personal auto insurance policy and details of your coverages with you to the rental car counter. You may be asked a question that these papers can help answer—or, if you’re in doubt, you’ll have your agent’s name and phone number readily available. “We want people to have the information they need to make more informed decisions about car insurance,” said Crawley.

 

“Knowing whether you need to buy additional coverage can save you money and give you peace of mind so you can enjoy your vacation. Don’t start off your trip questioning your decisions—take control by talking with your independent agent or broker and knowing the answers to those inevitable questions.”

 

 


Putting Insurance Companies To Work For You

by Edward Pevnick in auto

(NAPS)—Car insurance may be one of the last things that comes to mind when you think about saving time, but the insurance company you choose can actually have a big impact on your time should trouble strike.

If you’re in an accident that results in a claim, you could spend days handling the claims/repair process yourself.

That’s one reason it’s a good idea to check out insurance options that can save you time. For instance, the concierge-level of claims service offered by The Progressive Group of Insurance Companies is a unique claims repair option that takes only 15 minutes to complete. Simply drop off the damaged vehicle at one of Progressive’s facilities offering this service and a claims representative handles the entire claims/repair process for you— from start to finish.

Here’s how the process works:

You can call or go online to report a claim—anytime of the day or night—and schedule an appointment to bring the vehicle to a nearby facility offering the concierge-level of claims service.

In about 15 minutes, you’re in a rental car (if included on your policy) with assurance that you’ll receive updates from your claims representative.

Your claims representative prepares a repair estimate and contacts an auto body shop that has met strict quality requirements. Progressive and the shop reach an agreement on the cost of the repairs and the shop trans-ports the vehicle to the facility to begin repairs.

When work is finished, the vehicle is returned to the insurance facility, where your claims representative and the body shop inspect the repairs.

After the insurance company is satisfied with the repairs, you are called to pick up your car. You inspect the repairs and, if satisfied, drive off with a guarantee on those repairs for as long as you own the vehicle.


Uncovering Auto Insurance Myths

by Edward Pevnick in auto

Fact vs. Fiction: Uncovering auto insurance myths (March 2008)

Like a teenager eager to try a new video game, playing before reading the rules, many drivers buy insurance without really understanding what they’re buying. In the rush to feel “covered,” they can skip the details. That can lead to frustration.

Following are five insurance myths heard by some of the more than 13,000 claims people at Progressive, one of the country’s largest auto insurance companies:

 

Myth: I bought “full coverage” so everything’s paid for.

Reality: There is no such thing as “full coverage.” In most states, only liability insurance is mandatory. There are a lot of other coverage options out there, so select what you need and can afford based on your personal situation.


Myth: I need three estimates before my wrecked vehicle can be repaired.

Reality: Not necessarily. Very few insurers actually require this, although some might. If you decide to use a shop that’s in an insurance company’s “network” of pre-approved shops you may just have to get an estimate from that shop.


 

Myth: My insurance premium always increases if I’m involved in an accident.

Reality: It depends. Your rate can increase, decrease or stay the same. The information about your accident is combined with other information about you, your car and your driving history to determine your rate.


 

Myth: If I lend my car to someone and he/she crashes it, I’m covered.

Reality: Not so fast. If you or your friend don’t have optional physical damage coverages, damage to your vehicle generally won’t be covered.


 

Myth: If I buy a new car, my auto insurance company automatically knows; and my new car is covered.

Reality: No. Most insurance companies require that you notify them or your agent within a specified number of days. Generally, you have 30 days to add the new vehicle to your policy.

 


“Insurance can be complicated,” says Chuck Crist of Progressive. “It’s not something people deal with every day. So the more informed you are, the better choices you’ll make.”

To learn more, contact an independent agent or broker.


Auto Insurance Made Easy

by Edward Pevnick in auto

Insurance Matters
Auto Insurance Made Easy

(NAPS)—Understanding insurance can often be like trying to learn a foreign language. Many find it confusing and intimidating.

Fortunately, there’s help. Here is a quick reference designed to help you understand some of the most common kinds of coverages. The reference was put together by The Progressive Group of Insurance Companies.

Liability covers bodily injury and property damage (BI/PD). This covers your legal liability, up to the dollar limits you select, for damages caused to others in a covered vehicle accident. In most states today, liability insurance is mandatory.

Under BI/PD, your insurance company pays for damages to an injured person and for property damage that you are legally obligated to pay as a result of an accident. If your policy covers you in the event you’re sued after an accident, your insurance company will pay for a lawyer to defend you.

Liability limits generally appear as three numbers, for example, 25/50/25 or 100/300/100. The first number refers to the maximum amount, in thousands, that your insurance company is obligated to pay for bodily injury per person. The second number is the maxi-mum that would be paid out for bodily injury per claim and the third number represents the maxi-mum amount your insurance company is obligated to pay for property damage you cause.

Collision. When you buy collision coverage, your insurance company pays for damages if your vehicle collides with another vehicle or object. Collision coverage involves a deductible amount you select when you purchase your policy. This amount is what you are required to pay before your insurance company starts picking up the tab. Remember, the deductible amount is the amount you need to pay in the event of a claim.

Comprehensivecovers dam-age caused by events other than a car collision—such as fire, theft, vandalism, hail or flood. It also covers damage caused by your vehicle colliding with an animal. And if your car is stolen, it will cover the cost of a rental, subject to a daily limit. Like collision coverage, a deductible usually applies.

Medical Coverage. Depending on the state in which you live, you may have available to you Medical Payments coverage or Personal Injury Protection (PIP) coverage. While these both work differently, they provide coverage for medical care provided to you as a result of a car accident.

Liss Insurance can help you determine the price, coverage and service that best meets your needs.

 

Did You Know?
Liability insurance is for bodily injury and property damage. This covers your legal liability, up to the dollar limits you select, for damages caused to others in a covered vehicle accident. In most states today, liability insurance is mandatory.


Four Questions To Get The Right Auto Insurance

by Edward Pevnick in auto

Using the right tool for a job is key to success in any profession. Experts say the same principle applies when selecting an auto insurance policy. Having the right type of policy can help ensure that you, your employees and your business are all protected in the unfortunate event that one of your vehicles is involved in an accident.

If you’re a business owner and you or your employees use a vehicle for business-related deliveries or to carry certain materials to and from a job site, you may need a commercial auto insurance policy that’s tailored to more closely suit the needs—and risks—of a business vehicle operator.

Here are some questions that can help you determine if you might need a commercial auto policy instead of a personal auto policy, courtesy of Liss Insurance:

 

  1. Do you need more liability coverage than your personal auto policy provides? Generally, a commercial auto policy provides higher limits of liability, but less or no coverage in areas that are typically not associated with commercial auto risks.
  2. Do you need special coverage for situations associated with con-ducting business? Commercial auto policies also usually offer certain coverages—such as hired and non-owned auto coverage and coverage for towing a trailer for business use—that are not available with personal auto policies.
  3. Do you need to list any employees as drivers? You can do this with a commercial auto insurance policy.
  4. Do you use your vehicle for business purposes? If you use your vehicle for things like pizza or newspaper delivery, catering, door-to-door consulting service, landscaping or snowplowing service, logging business, day care/church retreat van service and/or farm-to-market delivery, you might need a commercial auto policy.

Liss Insurance is an independent insurance agency – trained, licensed insurance professionals who offer personal service and advice. We can help match you with the type of policy that best suits your needs and those of your company.